CARES Act Funding to support small businesses during pandemic

On Oct. 23, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor John Husted announced a funding package meant to help organizations across Ohio that have been struggling financially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The CARES Act funding will total $419.5 million and is divided amongst several different agencies across Ohio; this includes $50 million from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to 47 different Community Action Agencies meant to provide rent, mortgage, and water assistance to Ohioans dating back to Apr. 1, 2020. $37.5 million will be allocated to the Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund, which will help restaurants and bars who have struggled to stay in business due to lockdowns related to

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A look into the Ohio Supreme Court

The Ohio Supreme Court currently operates in Columbus, Ohio. Frequently hearing new cases, the court is integral in the Ohio court system, yet many Ohioans don’t even know what it does. Founded in 1802, the Ohio Supreme Court is the highest legal system in the state and topped only by the U.S. Supreme Court. “Any cases that get to the Ohio Supreme Court they go through what you might imagine as a pyramid,” Akron University Professor Emeritus J. Dean Carro explained. “At the base are the trial courts, the middle are the court of appeals and at the pinnacle is the Supreme Court of Ohio.” Sreeves8 · Pyramid-Carro The court

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Local Law Enforcement Actively Working To Expand Diversity

By Becca Sagaris, Shelby Reeves and Sara Al Harthi KENT, Ohio — The Merriam-Webster definition of diversity is “the practice or quality of including or involving people from a range of different social and ethnic backgrounds and of different genders, sexual orientations, etc.”  Diversity in general in any workplace environment is important to ensure inclusion among all people involved, both staff and community. It is especially important in law enforcement to decrease the opportunity to abuse their power and increase their understanding of the people they serve, improving law enforcement’s relationship with the community. “Diversity within our department means having different groups well-represented within our agency,” Michael Lewis, the Administrative

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Executive Order from President Trump works to combat race and sex stereotyping

On September 22, President Donald Trump made the executive order on combatting race and sex stereotyping, specifically at the federal level in federal contracting and the federal workforce. “Today, however, many people are pushing a different vision of America that is grounded in hierarchies based on collective social and political identities rather than in the inherent and equal dignity of every person as an individual,” President Trump stated in the executive order. “This ideology is rooted in the pernicious and false belief that America is an irredeemably racist and sexist country; that some people, simply on account of their race or sex, are oppressors; and that racial and sexual identities

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Ohio Supreme Court Candidates and the upcoming November election

Election day is less than a month away, the final day to register to vote has passed and absentee ballots are on their way out to registered voters. When it comes to the Ohio Supreme Court Justices, they are all elected into their positions. Every state is different when it comes to electing or nominating judges and justices. The judicial selection ranges from a partisan election, a nonpartisan election, legislative election, gubernatorial appointment and assisted appointment. In Ohio, justices are a part of the partisan primaries — choosing a side that they identify the most with during the time. When it comes to the November election, the justices then run

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IT “issues” leave Veterans without crucial GI Bill Benefits

     A glitch with the Information Technology Department at the Veteran Affairs office has just about every news outlet talking. Over 82,000 United States soldiers are left without benefits they were promised. This issue has spread from veterans, to active duty soldiers to National guardsoldiers, myself included. So I sat down with Staff Sergeant (SSG) Branham, an Army National Guard Recruiter on Kent State University’s campus, to discuss what the GI Bill is and why it is so important for people like me.      SSG Branham: “Well the GI Bill for National Guard soldiers, is a federal funded paycheck that you can receive for being a full time

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New City Hall to consolidate management departments, bring ‘city campus’ feel to Kent

In an effort to bring the bulk of city management under one roof, the City of Kent plans to construct a city hall in 2020. Gwen Rosenberg, councilwoman-at-large for Kent City Council, said having a designated city hall building will be a first for Kent. “There was a vision to have a sort of city campus, with a police department, fire department (and) city hall,” Rosenberg said. “The city hall as it was was kind of broken up into different spaces.” Consolidation of many of the city management departments will help round out this vision. The city hall will be constructed in place of the old police station on the

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Residents use “Democracy Day” to address concerns with Kavanaugh, corporate wealth

Kent City Council gathered Wednesday for “Democracy Day,” an event designated to hear public concerns regarding financial political contributions by corporations. The session was seasoned with criticism of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Bill Wilen, a member of Cuyahoga Falls’ chapter of Indivisible, states their goal is to, “resist practically everything related to the Trump agenda.” Wilen set the tone of the hearing, saying corporations are not people with a constitutional right to free speech and money is not equivalent to speech. “That’s why we are here tonight, because democracy encourages us, we the people, to be active in causes that make democracy stronger,” Wilen said. “The dark money of

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Stow City Council hears resident concerns, passes legislation

Stow residents filled City Hall’s seats Thursday to speak out on an alleged altercation between the mayor and a councilman. Mayor Sara Kline reported to police that Councilman Bob Adaska shoved her after the March 22 council meeting.  Report made by Mayor Sara Kline against Councilman Bob Adaska. According to the police report, Kline accused Adaska of “assault” and “disorderly conduct – fighting or threatening.” Police charged Adaska Wednesday with simple misconduct. Law Director Amber Zibritosky said the Summit County Sheriff’s Office will complete the investigation. Adaska claimed he was getting out of his seat to leave the meeting when the mayor “yelled” at him and “pointed fingers” about comments

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Ohio Food Banks, Lawmakers React to SNAP Reform

  Words by Alex Kamczyc and Alec Slovenec   On Feb. 12, the White House released its budget plan for 2019, the second for the new administration. The budget, which projected an economic growth rate of three percent, proposed cuts to numerous government programs including the FBI, the EPA, and government assistance programs like Medicare and Social Security. It also plans to raise military spending by 777 billion dollars.   However, perhaps the most notable change was the 27.4 percent cut to SNAP benefits received by 41 million people in the United States. A change that’s leaving many, including the food banks that work to serve low-income families in Ohio,

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