Ohio Dairy Farms Decreasing as Farmers Face Challenges

There were less than half as many dairy farms operating in the United States in 2019 compared to 2002 according to the USDA. In 17 years, the number of licensed herds went from 74,100 to 34,187. In Ohio, there are about 1,750 dairy farms compared to 2,647 in January 2017. The number of farms continues to decrease, but the economic impact of dairy products sold and produced accounts for $23.8 billion. Being a dairy farmer is a demanding job with a lot of challenges, said Rebecca Oravets, a former dairy farmer in Rootstown Township. Oravets and her husband operate Old Forge Dairy. Previously, they milked their own cows but now

Read more

Kent City Council Committee sets ordinance at meeting prohibiting mass gatherings of more than 10 starting Nov. 7

KENT, Ohio — The Kent city council committee voted to implement an ordinance to prohibit mass gatherings of more than 10 people during their monthly city council committee meeting Wednesday evening. The meeting started with a discussion on the Committee of the Whole’s topic about diversity hiring policies and practices, which dominated the discussion for the first half of the meeting. The topic was discussed specifically in relation to the police and education departments, strategizing ways for them to do better. The Health and Public Safety Committee’s topic was up next, regarding the prohibition of mass gatherings. This topic was also a highlight of the evening, dominating the conversation for

Read more

Asbestos on Campus

By Julie Selby & Melinda Stephan Renovations at Kent State warrant attention to the cancer-causing mineral that may be hidden in some of these buildings: asbestos. Changes are everywhere on Kent’s campus this semester: out with the old and in with the new.  There are many older buildings being given a face lift or, in the case of Van Deusen and the Art Annex, a complete remodel.  According to KSU’s Description of Current Projects, some are being demolished, renovated or retrofitted with newer heating, air conditioning and ventilation (HVAC) systems to meet energy goals.    What students casually walking by some of these old buildings may not realize is that many

Read more

New “Mobile” Method of Making Methamphetamine Adds a Twist to Police Work in Portage County

The Portage County Drug Task Force raided 211 meth labs in 2014, more than twice as many as the 87 meth labs found in 2013. Portage County has become one of the capitals of meth in the state of Ohio. The reason for the increase is a new, portable form of creating meth called “shake and bake,” which allows the methamphetamine to be made more quickly and more easily. All the components necessary for making meth are combined in a Two-liter soda bottle and shaken back and forth. Most of those components are common but sometimes toxic household chemicals such as cold pills, batteries, drain cleaner, and camping fuel. This

Read more

Dangers of abandoned meth labs

Dangers of Meth Production from Jennifer Roberts on Vimeo. Methamphetamine production has been on the rise in Ohio for the past several years, especially in Summit County. In 2013 alone, police found 87 active or abandoned meth labs in the county. That’s less than half the number found the previous year, but Summit County still had the highest number in the state. Meth labs in Summit County | Create infographics The preferred method of cooking meth has also changed in recent years. The older styles of meth labs, clandestine and red phosphorous, are declining. The clandestine and red phosphorous methods require more equipment and take more time than the “one-pot”

Read more

Neuron Discovery Could Change the Way We Study Evolution

The von Economo neuron (VEN) was thought to be human-specific, until Dr. Mary Raghanti took the research into her own hands. Dr. Raghanti is a professor at Kent State, but has spent the past 10 years studying this vastly misunderstood part of the brain. The exact function of VENs are still unknown. However, Dr. Raghanti’s research may be steering us in the right direction. The presence of these neurons is not a new discovery. They have been observed in humans and apes since 1926, but just this past year Dr. Raghanti and her team found high levels in other mammals. Whales, deer, mice, cow, and many others were found to

Read more

Senator Brown cosponsors bill aimed at decreasing infant mortality in Ohio

Dr. Tanya Banerjee on the importance of prenatal, maternal care from Kelsey Leyva on Vimeo. Story by Kelsey Leyva Jinre Jones, senior at Kent State University, wanted to stay local when she began looking for an OB-GYN after she found out she was pregnant in September of 2013. “I was trying to stay in town just for convenience,” Jones said. Jones, 22, is originally from Lafayette, Indiana and moved to Kent, Ohio in 2011 to pursue a degree in accounting. “It was difficult to find somebody, especially being [from] out of state and not really knowing anything about the health care system out of state.” After searching online, she found

Read more

Tom Wilke starts as new Economic Development Director

Audio by: Aja Phillips Story by: Julia Adkins   As of January 2015, Tom Wilke started his new position as the economic development director for the City of Kent. The City of Kent began to accept applications for the position in 2014, after the loss of previous economic development director Dan Smith. “The city’s Human Resources Manager, Elizabeth Zorc, posted a notice that state the City was accepting applications for the position in the newspaper, on the city website and sent the notice to several economic and community development organizations for posting on their respective websites,” said Community Development Director Bridget Susel. The city had received 15 different applications for

Read more

How to protect health, finances during flu season

by Alicia Balog As students prepare for both the upcoming winter and finals week, Kent State University and health departments throughout the country recommend preparing for flu season as well. What is the flu? The “seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses” that usually lasts one to two weeks, according to flu.gov. Flu season, which began in October, typically goes to April or May depending on the year, said Becky Lehman, director of health education and promotion at the Portage County Health Department. Approximately 5 to 20 percent of people get the flu, according to flu.gov, Lehman said despite what people say, a person does not

Read more