CARES Act Funding to support small businesses during pandemic

On Oct. 23, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine and Lt. Governor John Husted announced a funding package meant to help organizations across Ohio that have been struggling financially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The CARES Act funding will total $419.5 million and is divided amongst several different agencies across Ohio; this includes $50 million from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to 47 different Community Action Agencies meant to provide rent, mortgage, and water assistance to Ohioans dating back to Apr. 1, 2020. $37.5 million will be allocated to the Bar and Restaurant Assistance Fund, which will help restaurants and bars who have struggled to stay in business due to lockdowns related to

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A look into the Ohio Supreme Court

The Ohio Supreme Court currently operates in Columbus, Ohio. Frequently hearing new cases, the court is integral in the Ohio court system, yet many Ohioans don’t even know what it does. Founded in 1802, the Ohio Supreme Court is the highest legal system in the state and topped only by the U.S. Supreme Court. “Any cases that get to the Ohio Supreme Court they go through what you might imagine as a pyramid,” Akron University Professor Emeritus J. Dean Carro explained. “At the base are the trial courts, the middle are the court of appeals and at the pinnacle is the Supreme Court of Ohio.” Sreeves8 · Pyramid-Carro The court

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Health department can issue fines under new ordinance passed by Kent City Council

By Sarah Limas and Chris Ramos Kent City Council passed an ordinance during their Oct. 7 meeting, which gives the health commissioner the ability to shut down gatherings that exceed 10 non-household members and issue civil fines. In recent weeks, Kent State has had to quarantine dorms in response to the increase of cases occurring on campus. Meanwhile, Portage County has remained at level three for the risk of COVID-19 spread. There has been concern surrounding off-campus housing and large gatherings, which was previously referred to as being the most significant factor in the increase of new cases involving people under the age of 29 by Gov. Mike DeWine.  In

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An Overview of Ohio’s Unemployment Crisis

Ohio’s economic situation in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic continues to fluctuate, as varying numbers in unemployment cases continue despite many businesses resuming operations. Despite current unemployment claims steadily declining, first-time applicants have continued to rise. The Ohio Department of Jobs and Family Services (ODJFS) reported 18,952 new applications filed during the week ending Oct. 3. It was the third straight week in which new unemployment applicants had increased. Over the last 28 weeks, there have been more initial unemployment claims than the previous four years combined. Over 1.7 million Ohioans have filed for first-time benefits in 2020, whereas over 1.5 million Ohioans combined had filed before 2020. “There

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How CARES Funds Helped Kent Community

According to The United States Treasury, “the CARES Act provides assistance for State, Local, and Tribal Governments. Through the Coronavirus Relief Fund, the CARES Act provides for payments to State, Local, and Tribal governments navigating the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. The CARES Act established the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund.”  The City of Kent is an entitlement community, which means that the City receives a direct allocation of federal money to the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) due to annually low-income numbers.  CARES Act funds were being provided to any entitlement community that was already receiving annual CDBG money; however, these funds are called Community Development Block Grant Coronavirus

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CROWN act fights to end hair discrimination for African Americans

“You think about sometimes when you rent an apartment or buy a home,” said Dezie Woods-Jones, state president of Black Women Organized for Political Action and supporting member of the CROWN act. “I mean it’s how the public viewed you. If you didn’t look in the traditional manner, you could be rejected from all those opportunities, just because of the way you chose to wear your hair.”  Founded by Dove and California state senator Holly J. Mitchell on April 22, 2019, the CROWN act, (creating an open and respectful workplace) began “to ensure protection against discrimination based on race-based hairstyles by extending statutory protection to hair texture and protective styles such

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Navigating reopening public schools during COVID-19 pandemic: A superintendent’s point of view

HD: Navigating reopening public schools during pandemic: A superintendent’s point of view Schools across the country are slowly starting to welcome students back after transfering to fully remote instruction in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. During the COVID-19 press briefing on August 8, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine broke down the districts across the state and how they’re approaching the return to the classroom this fall.  According to DeWine, 325 districts are planning to return to school full-time, encompassing about 590,000 public school students. 55 districts, 398,000 public school students, will be fully remote. 154 districts, approximately 380,000 public school students, will do a hybrid model and 78 districts did

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COVID-19’s impact on law enforcement

Summit county deputy sheriff Ryan Jones is use to adapting quickly to new environments. As a former corrections officer and a current Sgt. in the Ohio National Guard, preparing yourself for any situation is part of the job. Since April 20, 2020, Jones’ first day as a deputy sheriff, his job has been full of surprises. With new reports of coronavirus increasing everyday and expectation of worsening numbers, the safety of workers in public services has been a major topic. Jones discusses how law enforcement is navigating their duties during this pandemic. Q: Can you explain to me what your job as a deputy sheriff entails? RJ: My job is to

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The Difference Between Voting Procedures

Kathleen Clyde started her position as a Portage County commissioner, which is the lead position in the county on the elected side, in Dec. 2018, where she oversees county operations that fall under the commissioners. Before this position, in Jan. 2011, Clyde started the first of four terms as a state representative, where she specialized in voting and election issues. She served as an election official in the 2008 election, where she ran the early-vote center in Franklin County. She is also an attorney with a specialty in election law. Clyde answered questions about the different ways Ohioans can vote this year, as well as other general voting inquiries. Q:

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